Cookbooks and recipes

How do I get the recipes and processes I use in all of my canning?

Well, let me tell you…I cheat.

I use older cookbooks.  Those are the absolute best.  If it’s from the 20’s on to about the 80’s, it’s my favorite.  I don’t go looking for them, though.  The best ones show up from other people.  For example.  My Good Housekeeping cookbook?  Did I use the one my mother gave me for christmas 5 years ago?  A little, but when I want a tried and true recipe, I reach for the copy that came with my then fiance who got it at a garage sale, which is currently falling apart.  No binding for the 1949 edition of GH. I’m gonna have to get it re-bound, because it has recipes for things like, chicken with biscuts that the new one just doesn’t have.  It also, like it’s Betty Crocker companion (the re-print version of the original 1940’s book), has canning instructions and recipes in it! 

What I really love, though, is a little book that somehow made it’s way unknown into my library titled “Old-time pickling and spicing recipes”, by Florence Brobeck, dated MCMLIII, or, 1953.  It’s short, only 120 pages, but when I want to spice somthing, or make a jam, jelly or pickle, it’s the book I pull out, regardless of all the other, newer books on my shelf.  I may not necessarily go by the spicing, but it’s where I generally start. 

The bestest, newest thing I’ve gotten, came yesterday, from my mom.  She forbade my sister, who is moving, to throw this out, and regifted it to me.  I already love it.  It’s not the Ball Blue Book, it’s the Kerr Home Canning Book (and how to freeze foods) from 1973, though much of it was reprinted from earlier.  It even has how to can meat, in Kerr Jars.  All, for the beautiful price of .35 cents!

That last little blurb?  …Eat Better…Save Money…

And I absolutely love the add from the 40’s on the inside of the last page!

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About catfeet1

Mom, canner, reader, sci-fi geek, she who loves car seats
This entry was posted in Canning, Household, Prepping, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Cookbooks and recipes

  1. Pingback: Cookbooks and recipes | Vintage Cookbooks | Scoop.it

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